Phone Meetings and Little Gains

(Why am I naming days?) 10/16/14, Day 14,044 (Mercena Day 62): Phone Meetings and Little Gains I really wanted to go to work yesterday. I had told myself that it was possible (it was never really possible). I needed it to be possible, both for my own sense of progress and because I had four meetings (not counting a CSA veggie pick-up and Lark event). But my healing progress is so slow, so on went the speaker phone. Thankfully, Mercena had a great day, and Lori rode to our rescue, accompanying Heather for the veggie pick-up. And I was able to participate somewhat effectively calling in from the phone. In spite of all that, I did make some small gains by staying as mobile as the pain would allow. And late last night, I even finished five more pages of my New Year play (a slippery time play written for the actors of the Ensemble). Technique never stands still: it only advances or retreats… Writing: 163 out of 212 days (New Year) Spanish: 134 out of 212 days Music: 63 out of 118 days Yoga: 2 out of 2 days What small things did I do yesterday to help build the Honeycomb? (And what does it mean to “Help build the honeycomb?”) Ate and cooked local, organic, vegetarian food, and used cloth diapers for Mercena; Signed a petition in support of stronger protections against illegal fishing; Asked EBay to cut ties with […]

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Taina and Marvin First Draft Complete

(Why am I naming days?) 10/4/14, Day 14,032 (Mercena Day 50): Taina and Marvin First Draft Complete Yesterday was a good day: Mercena turned fifty days old, and I finished the first draft of my next full-length play, currently titled Taina and Marvin. There’s a lot I’m happy about with this play: The characters, the structure, the self-inflicted political heartbreak […]

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The Metacognition of the Western Scrub Jay

Any honorable ethics for the anthropocene must transform our valuation of animals from utility to the respect conscious beings deserve. To that end, I love learning of examples of animal intelligence such as the meta-cognition of Western Scrub Jays: “Western scrub jays, corvids native to western North America, are a favorite of cognitive scientists because they are not “stuck in time”—that is, they are able to remember past events and are known to cache their food in anticipation of hunger…the findings are exciting because they provide further evidence that humans are not the only species with the ability to think about their thought processes.” –Scientific American, Jason G. Goldman

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